Intrinsically safe?

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e5569
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Intrinsically safe?

Post by e5569 »

This might be a bit of a strange question but I was wondering if laser scanners were intrinsically safe? Can the laser detonate any kind of explosive or be operated in an explosive atmosphere?
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by 3DForensics »

i would say overall, yes, they are safe. Laser scanners have been used before to document explosion sites and I have heard the suggestion that they could be used to detect explosives.

However, unlesss the explosives are specialized to be detonated with light, I can't see how they would cause an explosion on their own.

Eugene
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by T Burghart »

Hello,

Even if the laser scanners seems to be safe there are very strict rules and regulations using electronic equipment on explosive sites.
The only 3D laserscanner that was especially built for use in explosive environments is the IMAGER 5006EX from Z+F and DMT.
This scanner is ATEX approved for use in mining applications class I M2 and industrie applications class II 2G.
First of all it is important to know from your customer what classified ares you should scan.
For example in an chemical plant there are areas where gas could cause an explosive atmosphere.
This could be a "Zone 2" area. You could know check if it is possible to use normal equipment or if you must use special approved and certified equipment.

Hope that helps.

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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by 3DForensics »

Thorsten,

Is the concern from the laser light that is being emitted or from the actual electronics inside the unit? What makes up the ATEX approval?

Regards,

Eugene
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by rlasater »

Just a thought...

If the explosive used a laser-triggered detonator, for instance you would point a laser pointer at it to set it off, the scanner would have that effect. Since the scanner would point the laser at millions of positions, it would likely point at the detonator sooner or later.

Does such a thing exist?
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by TMelvin »

most likely if it exists it would be a military application. seems laser activated explosives would be a bit hard to control on a work site with all the laser applications out there now days. less its activated by a sequience of laser flashes.
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by T Burghart »

Eugene,

The concern is from the electronic inside the unit and the laser.
Some more information you could find in the ATEX directive 94/4/EG "Equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres".
It is not only interesting if the laser or the equipment could ignite the goods for example.
It is important that areas where explosive goods are stored are classified.
In this classified areas you have to check if you must use an approved system.
The ATEX approval tells you that this equipment doesn´t have couldn´t ignite the explosives (gas, vapour, etc.).
It tells you that even the laser beam doesn´t have enough power.

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Thorsten
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by e5569 »

Thanks for he discussion. I was thinking more of the laser itself and not the unit.
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by rlasater »

Those of us going to the Leica conference could go see the Mythbusters guys and make it happen! ;)
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Re: Intrinsically safe?

Post by rchampis »

I've recently looked into this and in order for something to be intrinsically safe the battery needs to be fully self contained within the unit. This was confirmed for me by the leica support team.
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